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Cautious optimism evident in global pork markets

Cautious optimism evident in global pork markets

Cautious optimism evident in global pork markets Meat / Poultry / Animal Protein – Christine McCracken – November 5, 2019 Meat + Poultry covers insights and analysis from Rabobank’s Pork Quarterly Q4 report. Senior Animal Protein Analyst Christine...

Restaurants Are Turning To Faux-Guacamole Due To High Avocado Prices

Restaurants Are Turning To Faux-Guacamole Due To High Avocado Prices

Last year’s California heat wave delayed blooming for avocado crops, resulting in fewer Californian avocados available, explains Senior Analyst David Magana. “It started later than normal, and yields were lower this year,” he says, adding that Mexican avocados were able to fill the void, though those supplies are now running low as well.

Holy Guacamole! Avocados Are Pricey And It’s The Pits

Holy Guacamole! Avocados Are Pricey And It’s The Pits

Amid record-high avocado prices, some L.A. restaurants have been selling guacamole without avocados, replacing the key ingredient with Mexican summer tender, a small squash. “We have the strongest demand for avocados in the U.S., probably ever,” said Rabobank Senior Analyst David Magana. He explains how seasonal weather patterns affected California avocado yields, putting extra pressure on Mexican avocado farmers and contributing to a critical shortage of the popular fruit. Listen to the interview on NPR’s The Salt here.

‘Crazy Flower’ Saves Avocado Lovers From Record-High Prices

‘Crazy Flower’ Saves Avocado Lovers From Record-High Prices

Just as record-high Mexican avocado prices were starting to squeeze American consumers, a “crazy flower” bloom on Mexican avocado trees is easing supply concerns, reports Bloomberg. Improved avocado supply in California in recent weeks is also taking the pressure off Mexico to provide the main ingredient for guacamole served in U.S. restaurant chains, said Rabobank Senior Analyst David Magana.

China Deals ‘Body Blow’ to Struggling U.S. Farm Belt

China Deals ‘Body Blow’ to Struggling U.S. Farm Belt

China’s halt to U.S. agricultural imports is particularly painful for U.S. hog farmers and pork processors, who were counting on higher exports to China, the world’s largest pork-consuming country, as a result of African Swine Fever, reports the Wall Street Journal. Rabobank estimates that China could lose up to 50% of its hog herd by the end of this year due to deaths from the disease and culling.

Rabobank Expects Up to 50% Loss in World’s Largest Pig Herd

Rabobank Expects Up to 50% Loss in World’s Largest Pig Herd

Farm Journal’s PORK – Christine McCracken – August 6, 2019
Rabobank predicts that China could lose up to 50% of its hog herd by 2020 due to African Swine Fever. “Half of the world’s pigs are in China and half of those are now eliminated, we think. Roughly a quarter of the world’s pigs have now perished,” said Senior Protein Analyst Christine McCracken. “That is a huge loss. It will leave the world quite obviously short of protein. It’s something that should be a big factor as we move into 2020.”

Tyson Foods Doesn’t Turn Tail in Perilous Market After Earnings

Tyson Foods Doesn’t Turn Tail in Perilous Market After Earnings

he Street – Rabobank mention – August 5, 2019
Despite strong third quarter earnings, Tyson Foods is not immune to the effects of the trade war on the overall food industry as pork continues to struggle and hog costs increase, reports The Street. Rabobank has predicted 200 million pigs will be killed either by the disease or action to curb the outbreaks, according to a Rabobank report.

Arkansas-based OK Foods offers workers raises, cars

Arkansas-based OK Foods offers workers raises, cars

OK Foods is raising its base hourly pay rate by 30 cents and awarding new cars to employees as an incentive, reports The Arkansas Gazette. An ever-tightening labor force has forced meatpackers to increase wages to retain employees. However, efforts to retain workers with 10% and 20% wage increases have been “at best, minimally effective,” said Senior Animal Protein Analyst Christine McCracken in a labor report published in 2018.